Gallery 2008

Water Tiger School of T'ai Chi Ch'uan Patchogue Long Island New York

Laoshi Laurince D. McElroy

Suffolk County, Long Island

New York USA

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2008

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In the Kwoon, Monkeying Around (January 2008): Walking the circle is the standard way to play Wu Qin Xi (the Five Animal Frolics) in the Wu-Dang tradition – marking the circle with various plush animals may be considered a little less standard. Leading the group in the Monkey Picking the Peach is Laoshi Laurince McElroy (Front Left).

In the Kwoon, Monkeying Around (January 2008): Walking the circle is the standard way to play Wu Qin Xi (the Five Animal Frolics) in the Wu-Dang tradition – marking the circle with various plush animals may be considered a little less standard. Leading the group in the Monkey Picking the Peach is Laoshi Laurince McElroy (Front Left).

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Straight Sword (February 2008): As the afternoon progresses the play becomes more involved and McElroy Laoshi (L) leads participants through Biggest Star in the Big Dipper from the “first section” of Water Tiger School’s approach to the 32-posture Orthodox Straight Sword Form.

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Straight Sword (February 2008): As the afternoon progresses the play becomes more involved and McElroy Laoshi (L) leads participants through Biggest Star in the Big Dipper from the “first section” of Water Tiger School’s approach to the 32-posture Orthodox Straight Sword Form.

In the Kwoon, Monkeying Around (January 2008): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (R) demonstrating and talking through details of the Monkey Presenting the Peach to the Immortal Spirit from the Wu-Dang Five Animal Frolics while the group plays along.

In the Kwoon, Monkeying Around (January 2008): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (R) demonstrating and talking through details of the Monkey Presenting the Peach to the Immortal Spirit from the Wu-Dang Five Animal Frolics while the group plays along.

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Straight Sword (February 2008): To foster familiarity with the straight sword during the first repeat of the seminar series that began in January 2007, the group follows McElroy Laoshi (L) in a walking exercise of Right / Left Interception.

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Straight Sword (February 2008): To foster familiarity with the straight sword during the first repeat of the seminar series that began in January 2007, the group follows McElroy Laoshi (L) in a walking exercise of Right / Left Interception.

In the Kwoon, Meditation 101: Pathways to Stillness (March 2008): The participants may not look like they're doing much, but the seminar began with a focus on the exploration of seven different breathing techniques. Everyone soon discovered there's a lot more to breath than simple inhalation and exhalation.

In the Kwoon, Meditation 101: Pathways to Stillness (March 2008): The participants may not look like they're doing much, but the seminar began with a focus on the exploration of seven different breathing techniques. Everyone soon discovered there's a lot more to breath than simple inhalation and exhalation.

Camp Edey (Bayport), Girl Scouts of Suffolk County's GirlFest `08 (May 3, 2008): Si-Goo Mui Francesca DeStefano (L in light gray) and Laoshi Laurince McElroy (R in light gray) instruct mothers and their daughters in the broader points of T’ai Chi’s redirection-of-force principle.

Camp Edey (Bayport), Girl Scouts of Suffolk County's GirlFest `08 (May 3, 2008): Si-Goo Mui Francesca DeStefano (L in light gray) and Laoshi Laurince McElroy (R in light gray) instruct mothers and their daughters in the broader points of T’ai Chi’s redirection-of-force principle.

Camp Edey (Bayport), Girl Scouts of Suffolk County's GirlFest `08 (May 3, 2008): Playing the posture Brush Knee Step and Strike, Laoshi Laurince McElroy sends Si-Hing Joel Valerio flying backwards during a martial applications demonstration at the Martial Arts for Every Girl tent at the day-long event.

Camp Edey (Bayport), Girl Scouts of Suffolk County's GirlFest `08 (May 3, 2008): Playing the posture Brush Knee Step and Strike, Laoshi Laurince McElroy sends Si-Hing Joel Valerio flying backwards during a martial applications demonstration at the Martial Arts for Every Girl tent at the day-long event.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 3, 2008): At the end of the rather brisk first morning in the park finishes as Laoshi Laurince McElroy talks the small group of participants through the finer points of Rock Back & forth to Remove Stagnation from Water Tiger’s T’ai Chi Qigong Breathing Set.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 3, 2008): At the end of the rather brisk first morning in the park finishes as Laoshi Laurince McElroy talks the small group of participants through the finer points of Rock Back & forth to Remove Stagnation from Water Tiger’s T’ai Chi Qigong Breathing Set.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 10, 2008): A beautiful morning in the park culminates with Laoshi Laurince McElroy taking the group in a circle pattern of the Basic Walk from the Five Animal Frolics.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 10, 2008): A beautiful morning in the park culminates with Laoshi Laurince McElroy taking the group in a circle pattern of the Basic Walk from the Five Animal Frolics.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 17, 2008): Staying on one of the few dry patches in the park, participants experience the details of Medium-Frame Yang-style T’ai Chi’s Wave Hands Like Clouds with Laoshi Laurince McElroy.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 17, 2008): Staying on one of the few dry patches in the park, participants experience the details of Medium-Frame Yang-style T’ai Chi’s Wave Hands Like Clouds with Laoshi Laurince McElroy.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 24, 2008): A picture-perfect morning adds to the beauty of the T’ai Chi in the Park favorite T’ai Chi Flying.

T’ai Chi in the Park (May 24, 2008): A picture-perfect morning adds to the beauty of the T’ai Chi in the Park favorite T’ai Chi Flying.

In the Kwoon, T’ai Chi Straight Sword – The Journey Continues (June 2008): During this seminar’s advanced focus on Water Tiger School’s approach to the 32-posture Orthodox Straight Sword Form, others observe as McElroy Laoshi (L) demonstrates and talks through the details of the third posture, The Swallow Skims Over the Water.

In the Kwoon, T’ai Chi Straight Sword – The Journey Continues (June 2008): During this seminar’s advanced focus on Water Tiger School’s approach to the 32-posture Orthodox Straight Sword Form, others observe as McElroy Laoshi (L) demonstrates and talks through the details of the third posture, The Swallow Skims Over the Water.

In the Kwoon, T’ai Chi Straight Sword – The Journey Continues (June 2008): Stepping into Show the Direction, McElroy Laoshi (L) leads a mixed group with participants from three lineages in the intricacies Water Tiger School’s approach to the 32-posture Orthodox Straight Sword Form.

In the Kwoon, T’ai Chi Straight Sword – The Journey Continues (June 2008): Stepping into Show the Direction, McElroy Laoshi (L) leads a mixed group with participants from three lineages in the intricacies Water Tiger School’s approach to the 32-posture Orthodox Straight Sword Form.

Village of Patchogue, Alive After Five (July 18, 2008): Opening the Water Tiger’s Tradition Yang-Style Long Form, Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., and McElroy Laoshi break ground for the school – Si-Suk is the first Long Island student to complete the Long Form and this is the first time Si-Suk has played the form from opening to closing!

Village of Patchogue, Alive After Five (July 18, 2008): Opening the Water Tiger’s Tradition Yang-Style Long Form, Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., and McElroy Laoshi break ground for the school – Si-Suk is the first Long Island student to complete the Long Form and this is the first time Si-Suk has played the form from opening to closing!

Village of Patchogue, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Fundraiser (July 25, 2008): A new version of Water Tiger’s Grasp Sparrow’s Tail to the Four Cardinal Directions receives its public premiere on the streets of Patchogue during the three-hour marathon of T’ai Chi and Qigong. “Blossoming” opens with each of the players facing a central point instead of the traditional North.

Village of Patchogue, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Fundraiser (July 25, 2008): A new version of Water Tiger’s Grasp Sparrow’s Tail to the Four Cardinal Directions receives its public premiere on the streets of Patchogue during the three-hour marathon of T’ai Chi and Qigong. “Blossoming” opens with each of the players facing a central point instead of the traditional North.

Village of Patchogue, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Fundraiser (July 25, 2008): The 2008 Fundraising Team are still smiling after playing and soliciting cash from passers-by for three hours during Alive After Five on Main Street in the village. They are (from L to R) Mary Walsh, Si-Hing Joel Valerio, Si-Ji Patricia Hsieh, Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., Laoshi Laurince McElroy, Kathy Schwager, Si-Goo Mui Francesca DeStefano, Mark Williams, and Christine Reynolds. Rita Valentin also joined the festivities on the street, but is not pictured.

Village of Patchogue, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Fundraiser (July 25, 2008): The 2008 Fundraising Team are still smiling after playing and soliciting cash from passers-by for three hours during Alive After Five on Main Street in the village. They are (from L to R) Mary Walsh, Si-Hing Joel Valerio, Si-Ji Patricia Hsieh, Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., Laoshi Laurince McElroy, Kathy Schwager, Si-Goo Mui Francesca DeStefano, Mark Williams, and Christine Reynolds. Rita Valentin also joined the festivities on the street, but is not pictured.

Village of Patchogue, Alive After Five (August 1, 2008): Playing in synchronicity through the usual chaos that is the Guerrilla T’ai Chi experience, Laoshi Laurince McElroy (L) and Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., bring Water Tiger’s 24-Posture Form into closing with Circle Fist.

Village of Patchogue, Alive After Five (August 1, 2008): Playing in synchronicity through the usual chaos that is the Guerrilla T’ai Chi experience, Laoshi Laurince McElroy (L) and Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., bring Water Tiger’s 24-Posture Form into closing with Circle Fist.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 16, 2008): The morning’s break is always an opportunity to play and learn – demonstrated here by two students from Water Tiger School’s Sachem Public Library class seeking advice from Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., on the finer points of Fair Lady Weaves at Shuttles from the 24-Posture Form.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 16, 2008): The morning’s break is always an opportunity to play and learn – demonstrated here by two students from Water Tiger School’s Sachem Public Library class seeking advice from Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., on the finer points of Fair Lady Weaves at Shuttles from the 24-Posture Form.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 16, 2008): As participants arrived for the first morning in the park this session, they are greeted by Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., playing Single Whip from the WTS Long Form.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 16, 2008): As participants arrived for the first morning in the park this session, they are greeted by Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr., playing Single Whip from the WTS Long Form.

Bald Mountain (Uinta Mountains), UT: (August 19, 2008): Water Tiger School student Lem Coley plays a little modified Grasp Sparrow’s Tail near the 11,943 foot peak of Bald Mountain, the highest in the Western Uintas in Utah.

Bald Mountain (Uinta Mountains), UT: (August 19, 2008): Water Tiger School student Lem Coley plays a little modified Grasp Sparrow’s Tail near the 11,943 foot peak of Bald Mountain, the highest in the Western Uintas in Utah.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 23, 2008): With Shorefront Park taken over by The Battle for the Bay, Father Tortora Park in Patchogue sets the stage for Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr. (L), to lead the morning’s participants in Polishing the Mirror from The Temple Set.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 23, 2008): With Shorefront Park taken over by The Battle for the Bay, Father Tortora Park in Patchogue sets the stage for Si-Suk Paul Adago, Jr. (L), to lead the morning’s participants in Polishing the Mirror from The Temple Set.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 23, 2008): Under the shade of the trees in Father Tortora Park, Si-Goo Mui Francesca DeStefano (not pictured) helps participants understand the T’ai Chi principle of song (dynamic relaxation) with Water Tiger School’s Arm Drop exercise.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 23, 2008): Under the shade of the trees in Father Tortora Park, Si-Goo Mui Francesca DeStefano (not pictured) helps participants understand the T’ai Chi principle of song (dynamic relaxation) with Water Tiger School’s Arm Drop exercise.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 23, 2008): Playing in the shade and next to trees in Father Tortora Park is something new for participants, who are accustomed to sun and wind and the view of the bay in Shorefront Park. Also new for them is experiencing Si-Hing Joel Valerio (2nd from L) leading Turn Heaven and Earth in Front of the Body from Water Tiger’s T’ai Chi Qigong Breathing Set.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 23, 2008): Playing in the shade and next to trees in Father Tortora Park is something new for participants, who are accustomed to sun and wind and the view of the bay in Shorefront Park. Also new for them is experiencing Si-Hing Joel Valerio (2nd from L) leading Turn Heaven and Earth in Front of the Body from Water Tiger’s T’ai Chi Qigong Breathing Set.T’ai Chi in the Park (September 6, 2008): A handful of people – and other creatures – brave the morning of Hanna’s Long Island arrival for this year’s final T’ai Chi in the Park gathering.

T’ai Chi in the Park (September 6, 2008): A handful of people – and other creatures – brave the morning of Hanna’s Long Island arrival for this year’s final T’ai Chi in the Park gathering.

In the Kwoon, Grace of the Crane (September 2008): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (R) helps the group connect with a sense of grace and elegance while remaining light and peaceful with the Crane Flying, one of the five walks of the Crane from Wu Qin Xi (the Five Animal Frolics).

In the Kwoon, Grace of the Crane (September 2008): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (R) helps the group connect with a sense of grace and elegance while remaining light and peaceful with the Crane Flying, one of the five walks of the Crane from Wu Qin Xi (the Five Animal Frolics).

In the Kwoon, Grace of the Crane (September 2008): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (center) leads seminar participants in the Crane Gliding from the Wu-Dang Five Animal Frolics as they walk the traditional circular pattern marked this time by a monkey, a tiger, a bear, a heron (you try finding a plush crane), and – for reasons unknown – Odie from Garfield fame.

In the Kwoon, Grace of the Crane (September 2008): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (center) leads seminar participants in the Crane Gliding from the Wu-Dang Five Animal Frolics as they walk the traditional circular pattern marked this time by a monkey, a tiger, a bear, a heron (you try finding a plush crane), and – for reasons unknown – Odie from Garfield fame.

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Broadsword (October 2008): At the beginning of the afternoon’s seminar, Laoshi Laurince McElroy is in Dance of the Praying Mantis as he demonstrates Water Tiger School’s Yang-Influenced 24-Posture T’ai Chi Broadsword (Dao) Form.

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Broadsword (October 2008): At the beginning of the afternoon’s seminar, Laoshi Laurince McElroy is in Dance of the Praying Mantis as he demonstrates Water Tiger School’s Yang-Influenced 24-Posture T’ai Chi Broadsword (Dao) Form.

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Broadsword (October 2008): A very small group from two different lineages is following McElroy Laoshi (L) through The Crane Attacks and other details from Stage One of Water Tiger’s approach to T’ai Chi Dao (Broadsword).

In the Kwoon, Introduction to T’ai Chi Broadsword (October 2008): A very small group from two different lineages is following McElroy Laoshi (L) through The Crane Attacks and other details from Stage One of Water Tiger’s approach to T’ai Chi Dao (Broadsword).