Gallery 2016

Water Tiger School of T'ai Chi Ch'uan Patchogue Long Island New York

Laoshi Laurince D. McElroy

Suffolk County, Long Island

New York USA

2016

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In the Office (January 22, 2016): A gift from a student - drafted and created with his 3D printer.T’ai Chi in the Park (June 18, 2016): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (L) leads the morning’s participants through Water Tiger’s “Taste of the 24” exercise.T’ai Chi in the Park (June 25, 2016): Laoshi Joel Valerio (facing) takes the front for the morning to lead the group into the Water Tiger exercise “T’ai Chi Flying”.T’ai Chi in the Park (June 25, 2016): Another angle of Laoshi Joel Valerio (C - facing away) honing the details of “T’ai Chi Flying”.T’ai Chi in the Park (August 13, 2016): On the fifth anniversary of his ascension, Laoshi Joel Valerio introduces the morning’s attendees to “Tiger Stretching” from the “Five Animal Frolics” (Wu Qin Xi).T’ai Chi in the Park (August 13, 2016): One of the go-to warm-ups for these mornings is “Advance and Retreat” from “The Nine Temple Exercises”. Here, Laoshi Laurince McElroy (C) instructs the participants in its details.T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): The morning included partnering up and facing the challenge of relaxing and letting go of control with Water Tiger’s “Arm Drop” exercise.T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): Throughout the summer, we were graced with the presence of an osprey family. On this particular morning, we were given an air show with the parents apparently teaching their juveniles air combat. Here, an attack of the nest is avoided with a stealthy dive away.T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): Capturing the stunning beauty of an osprey in flight.T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): Even though the combat training unfolded through most of the morning, it was next to impossible to capture the full family of four.In the Office (November 4, 2016): A number of McElroy Laoshi's public class  t-shirts feature white tigers. He wants to make sure no one thinks he or Water Tiger supports the breeding of white tigers. Here are the facts, courtesy of Wildcat Sanctuary:
* White tigers are not a separate subspecies. They're not Royal White Tigers. They're not Snow Tigers. They're not albinos. They're simply tigers born with white fur. 
* White fur is a very rare genetic mutation occurring in the wild possibly in as few as one in 10,000 wild tiger births.
* The average number of cubs born to get one healthy white tiger cub to exhibit is one in 30. The other 29 cubs can typically be born deformed, considered the wrong color, or die shortly after birth due to genetic defects.
* Captive inbreeding of white tigers results in high neonatal mortality rates, typically exceeding 80%.
* Only 12 white tigers have been confirmed in the wild in over 100 years. The last white tiger was killed in the wild in 1958. There have been no further sightings of white tigers in the wild since.

In the Office (January 22, 2016): A gift from a student - drafted and created with his 3D printer.

T’ai Chi in the Park (June 18, 2016): Laoshi Laurince McElroy (L) leads the morning’s participants through Water Tiger’s “Taste of the 24” exercise.

T’ai Chi in the Park (June 25, 2016): Laoshi Joel Valerio (facing) takes the front for the morning to lead the group into the Water Tiger exercise “T’ai Chi Flying”.

T’ai Chi in the Park (June 25, 2016): Another angle of Laoshi Joel Valerio (C -  facing away) honing the details of “T’ai Chi Flying”.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 13, 2016): One of the go-to warm-ups for these mornings is “Advance and Retreat” from “The Nine Temple Exercises”. Here, Laoshi Laurince McElroy (C) instructs the participants in its details.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 13, 2016): On the fifth anniversary of his ascension, Laoshi Joel Valerio introduces the morning’s attendees to “Tiger Stretching” from the “Five Animal Frolics” (Wu Qin Xi).

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): The morning included partnering up and facing the challenge of relaxing and letting go of control with Water Tiger’s “Arm Drop” exercise.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): Capturing the stunning beauty of an osprey in flight.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): Even though the combat training unfolded through most of the morning, it was next to impossible to capture the full family of four.

T’ai Chi in the Park (August 27, 2016): Throughout the summer, we were graced with the presence of an osprey family. On this particular morning, we were given an air show with the parents apparently teaching their juveniles air combat. Here, an attack of the nest is avoided with a stealthy dive away.

Smith's Reef on Providenciales, Turks & Caicos (October 19, 2016): We often say that there's one surface that's tougher than the unforgiving softness of the mat at our studio and that's sand at the water's edge - each wave that hits the sand changes its consistency, its support. Here's McElroy Laoshi on holiday playing Water Tiger's Medium-Frame Yang-Style 24-Posture Form on the white coral sand at the water's edge.

Tao in Nature (October 25, 2016): One of our studio students, Jon Cabel, shared this image with us. He was working on grinding down the concrete floor at his job, preparing it for sealing and this appeared. No, it's not a pin or other jewelry stuck in the concrete; it's a conglomeration of separate stones that formed a natural Yin-Yang.

In the Office (November 4, 2016): A number of McElroy Laoshi's public class  t-shirts feature white tigers. He wants to make sure no one thinks he or Water Tiger supports the breeding of white tigers. Here are the facts, courtesy of Wildcat Sanctuary:

* White tigers are not a separate subspecies. They're not Royal White Tigers. They're not Snow Tigers. They're not albinos. They're simply tigers born with white fur.

* White fur is a very rare genetic mutation occurring in the wild possibly in as few as one in 10,000 wild tiger births.

* The average number of cubs born to get one healthy white tiger cub to exhibit is one in 30. The other 29 cubs can typically be born deformed, considered the wrong color, or die shortly after birth due to genetic defects.

* Captive inbreeding of white tigers results in high neonatal mortality rates, typically exceeding 80%.

* Only 12 white tigers have been confirmed in the wild in over 100 years. The last white tiger was killed in the wild in 1958. There have been no further sightings of white tigers in the wild since.